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Posted on 12/06/2010 12:45:00 PM

The X-ray Images by Nick Veasey

The 47-year-old Englishman estimates that over the past decade or so he’s x-rayed more than 4,000 objects. “I’m interested in how things work, and x-rays show what’s happening under the surface,” he says. “Plus, they look cool.” To get his pictures, Veasey uses industrial x-ray machines typically employed in art restoration (to examine oil paintings), electronics manufacturing (to inspect circuit boards), and the military (to check tanks for stress fractures).

“Most of the images that bombard us all are aspirational. I want to be sexy, cool, thin, younger… My work is real. X-Ray is an honest process. It shows things for what they are, what they are made of. I love that. It balances all that glossy, superficial bollocks. I’m real and straightforward. And so is my work.

I’m not that interested in using x-ray to shock, as too much art tries too hard to bludgeon a message home. Shock and gore is easy with x-ray. I like to create intrigue and beauty.”
- Nick Veasey


The image above is the largest x-ray photograph ever taken. It’s a Boeing 777 and required over 500 separate x-rays of individual elements to achieve.


















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1 comments

anney on Dec 18, 2010, 8:30:00 PM  

yeah! They do look really cool!